Governor Cooper Signs Crime Victims' Rights Week Proclamation

Today, Attorney General Josh Stein read Governor Roy Cooper's Crime Victims' Rights Week Proclamation at the North Carolina Victims' Garden. View the Governor's Proclamation Here.

Add your reaction Share

Victims vs. The Accused

Will victims’ rights trump defendants’ rights under Marsy’s Law?  Believe it or not, this is often a question asked of Marsy’s Law campaigns across the country – whether the accused and defendants will continue to have the rights afforded to them in state and federal constitutions, or if their rights will be taken away in favor of victims.

The short and simple answer is that no – the rights of the accused will not be impacted under Marsy’s Law. Nothing is taken away from the accused under Marsy’s Law, it simply gives victims of crime similar constitutional protections, or co-equal rights, as the accused. It seems like common sense that victims are treated the same in the eyes of the law – put another way, it will mean that no rapist has more rights than the victim and no murderer is afforded more rights than the victim’s family.  

Read more
Add your reaction Share

North Carolina working towards victims’ co-equal rights

Unless you’re a constitutional law expert – and most of us are decidedly not – you probably have a vague knowledge or have gleaned enough from television and movies to know that the Constitution carries certain rights for anyone accused of a crime. If you are fortunate enough not to have been personally involved in a serious crime, you probably haven’t thought too much about the other end of that equation – victims’ rights and how they are formally protected in our constitution.

The fact is victims’ rights are not specified like those who are accused of crime. Though it doesn’t seem possible when you stop and think about that reality, there are no enumerated rights for victims spelled out in either the U.S. Constitution or in 15 state constitutions, including North Carolina.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

North Carolina joining other state efforts

Marsy’s Law seeks to amend state constitutions that do not currently offer equal rights to victims of crimes that are already afforded to the accused and convicted. Crime victims have no enumerated rights in either the U.S. Constitution or in 15 state constitutions – including North Carolina.

It seems like common sense that crime victims have at least the same rights as those who are accused and convicted, but amazingly that is not necessarily the case.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Violent crime on the rise in North Carolina

For most people, violent crime is something seen on the news – somewhat distant and vague. Like seeing reports of a terrorist attack across the world, even violent crime that happens locally is typically removed from most people’s day-to-day lives. Though crime causes fear and caution for all of us, there is also a level of disconnect unless you have had the misfortune of being personally impacted.

But the reality is that crime does occur, and citizens here in North Carolina are facing the aftermath. Earlier this year, the state of North Carolina released a State Bureau of Investigation report with 2015 data showing that despite the overall crime rate drop statewide, violent crime – including murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault – increased by almost seven percent. This disturbing trend represents nationwide numbers as well.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Marsy’s Law kicking off in North Carolina

Each new year brings a new world of hope and opportunity. But for victims of crimes and their families, sadly, this is not always the case.  Physical injuries, fear, heartache and countless other burdens often follow victims and their families for years after the actual event – stripping their ability to share the same hope and optimism that others enjoy in the new year.

In North Carolina, 2017 is slated to begin a game-changing process to help correct some of the wrongs suffered by victims and their families.  Marsy’s Law for All, a victims’ rights initiative, will kick-off a statewide effort to amend the state constitution on behalf of North Carolina’s victims of crime – first through the 2017 legislative process followed by a statewide vote the following year. It is an exciting opportunity for North Carolinians to better understand this important issue and its broad impact; and to help our neighbors and friends who are affected by crime.

Read more
Add your reaction Share